Welcome:

Red&Grey is a design and branding agency. We make our clients stand out with clarity and creativity – helping their brand to grow.


Creativity:

Established in 2003, we’ve worked on a variety of creative projects – big, small, complex and international. Our clients come from a wide range of sectors located in Ireland and around the world.


Awards:

Our creative work has won several awards from ICAD and the IDI. In 2014, we were awarded a Special Outstanding Contribution to Design in Ireland Award for Pivot Dublin.

Process:

Our process is collaborative, research-based and concept driven. Our process connects our Irish strengths (conversation, storytelling, empathy) and our skills as designers (curiosity, imagination and play).

Services:

Branding
We create thoughtful, engaging brand identities together with a broad visual language that express who you are and inspire people to think, feel or act in a certain way.

Design for print
Bringing your brand to life through print, campaigns, and advertising. Communicating your brand across platforms projecting a cohesive, tactile and integrated approach to connect and encourage buy in.

Design for online
We design customised websites, social media and digital items that are both functional and immersive, connecting with those that matter most.

Design of spaces
We design carefully considered immersive spaces, exhibitions, events and signage to enhance the value of your brand and business.

Brand research
Discovering everything there is to know about your business, that makes it successful: its knowing it inside out. Here we are digging for gold, to uncover your ‘why’.

Brand strategy
At the heart of every great brand is a defined purpose. Here we give you a compass to strategically position your brand to allow it to meet its goals.

Naming
A core speciality, we create memorable meaningful names that have the power to directly affect your brand’s perception and ultimately its – copywriting.

Art Direction
We believe wholeheartedly in collaboration and work in earnest with complementary experts to activate your brand to achieve the best outcome possible.

Clients:

We enjoy working with like minded clients. We believe the quality of our client relationships reflects the quality of our work. We like to collaborate with clients, share ideas and co-create.

“Working with Red&Grey is always a pleasure. They are one of the most professional teams I have worked with. They combine strategic and profound thinking with the power of design. They see things from a holistic point of view and are able to capture this in simplistic yet powerful designs and brand identities. What is most telling about them, is that they really worked with me in redefining our company’s new brand strategy.”

Rutger Bonsel, Stamicarbon

Members:

We are members of the Institute of Creative Advertising & Design (ICAD), Institute of Designers (IDI), the 100 Archive and Ibec: Small Firms Association (SFA).

Studio sketches

Doodles, sketches from projects.

Aer Lingus rebrand?


Totally Dublin asked a number of local brand & design professionals: What are your thoughts on the new Aer Lingus rebrand? Here’s what Bob had to say.

“Aer Lingus, more than most businesses I can think of, represents Ireland on a global scale. So when they decide to rebrand, everybody tends to take notice. Rebranding your national airline is a project that needs to display confidence, strength, quality, and reliability.

In truth, it’s difficult to fully appreciate the conversations and research that may have been undertaken by New York agency, Lippincott in designing the rebrand. Nevertheless, one could assume the main purpose entrusted to them was to help the airline grow. Like all organisations, Aer Lingus needs to expand operations, increase profits, improve productivity, strengthen traditions and adapt to constant changes in their industry.

From the limited imagery I’ve seen to date, it’s unclear how Lippincott plans on using the rebrand to highlight Aer Lingus’s place in the global airline industry. Nor is it clear how they will address the needs and challenges of everyday customers in multiple contexts and locations around the world. This, after all, is what high-quality branding does and we can only hope there is more to this rebrand than what has currently been shown.

What is clear and easily appraised is the visual and verbal language they have introduced. Deep breath… The typography is poorly created and clunky in its application. The logotype has multiple faults across several letters. The shamrock is fine and is an improvement on the previous attempt, but fails to send a confident message. What’s worse is they seem to have decided to copy and paste it across all materials. Not exactly an engaging and dynamic system. Instead it highlights the lack of personality in the work produced. The Mrs Doyle tea cups are possibly an attempt to address this, but feel lazy and hackneyed. Surely this was an opportunity to do something far more interesting. Another misguided decision is the poorly crafted silver icon created for business class. All I can say is that it would be more at home in a Carroll’s gift shop (no disrespect to Carroll’s gift shops). Overall, the aesthetic of the materials produced are neither engaging nor sophisticated.

The typography is poorly created and clunky in its application. The logotype has multiple faults across several letters. The shamrock is fine and is an improvement on the previous attempt, but fails to send a confident message.

Finally, to the aircraft themselves. They’re professional yes, but there is nothing unique about the livery. It mirrors the design of many other airline livery from the last ten years. I suspect they have been designed to fit in, rather than stand out. I also suspect this is why Lippincott got the job. A quick look at their portfolio reveals two similarly designed aircraft. This, more than anything, shows a lack of confidence and understanding about the value and importance of our national airline. Hopefully, there is more to come from the design agency and client alike, but right now, the redesign weakens rather than strengthens the Aer Lingus brand.”

The full article can be read here.

From the limited imagery I’ve seen to date, it’s unclear how Lippincott plans on using the rebrand to highlight Aer Lingus’s place in the global airline industry. Nor is it clear how they will address the needs and challenges of everyday customers in multiple contexts and locations around the world. This, after all, is what high-quality branding does and we can only hope there is more to this rebrand than what has currently been shown.

What is clear and easily appraised is the visual and verbal language they have introduced. Deep breath… The typography is poorly created and clunky in its application. The logotype has multiple faults across several letters. The shamrock is fine and is an improvement on the previous attempt, but fails to send a confident message. What’s worse is they seem to have decided to copy and paste it across all materials. Not exactly an engaging and dynamic system. Instead it highlights the lack of personality in the work produced. The Mrs Doyle tea cups are possibly an attempt to address this, but feel lazy and hackneyed. Surely this was an opportunity to do something far more interesting. Another misguided decision is the poorly crafted silver icon created for business class. All I can say is that it would be more at home in a Carroll’s gift shop (no disrespect to Carroll’s gift shops). Overall, the aesthetic of the materials produced are neither engaging nor sophisticated.

The typography is poorly created and clunky in its application. The logotype has multiple faults across several letters. The shamrock is fine and is an improvement on the previous attempt, but fails to send a confident message.

Finally, to the aircraft themselves. They’re professional yes, but there is nothing unique about the livery. It mirrors the design of many other airline livery from the last ten years. I suspect they have been designed to fit in, rather than stand out. I also suspect this is why Lippincott got the job. A quick look at their portfolio reveals two similarly designed aircraft. This, more than anything, shows a lack of confidence and understanding about the value and importance of our national airline. Hopefully, there is more to come from the design agency and client alike, but right now, the redesign weakens rather than strengthens the Aer Lingus brand.”

The full article can be read here.

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